sys(X)tem

Curation and design of the sys(x)tem exhibition for the Splatterpool gallery in NYC. sys(x)tem is a multidisciplinary exhibition with the common thread of a probing deconstructive process.

It seeks to provide a playground for artists to make observations and pose questions on the function and dysfunction of systems with which we interface. Considering the definition of a system to be a whole compounded by several parts, the artists here attempt to insert themselves as a component of disruption. But rather random disruptions (as in natural mutation), these are made in deliberate operations with focused intention. Through methods of intervention, the artists may succeed in revealing fresh insight into familiar questions within the contemporary art discourse, such as those concerning reality versus representation.
2011


Within our contemporary digital culture, systems have assumed a central role in our daily lives in both overt and inconspicuous ways. Decision-making and learning have become ever more dependent on these systems as we voluntarily submit increasingly detailed and private information about the way we conduct our personal and business matters. As systems continue to develop, even beyond the understanding of their designers, we can begin to see their patterns and analogousness to systems in nature. Failures, errors and glitches can be likened to mutations in evolutionary models. And as in their counterparts, these deviations often lead to the advancement of a system’s sophistication and survival — or ultimately, to new forms altogether.
sys(x)tem is a multidisciplinary exhibition with the common thread of a probing deconstructive process. It seeks to provide a conversational, playground context for artists to make observations and pose questions on the function and dysfunction of systems with which we interface.
If we consider the definition of system to be a whole compounded by several parts, the artists here attempt to insert themselves as a component of disruption. But rather than disruptions at random (as in natural mutation), these are made in deliberate operations with focused intention.
Through methods of intervention, the artists may succeed in revealing fresh insight into familiar questions within the contemporary art discourse, such as those concerning reality versus representation. Ideally, the resulting statements made here will not be seen as critical in either a positive or negative value; but rather, viewers will be challenged to be more aware of their interaction with systems in our digital and physical environments.

Splatterpool Gallery, NYU, 2011
Participation artists:
Shay Arik | Future Archaeology | Megan Feehan | Riley Hooker | Carla Streckwall | Clement Valla | John Cayley